Now THIS is Horseradish….

It started out like this.  I  remember saying something like “there’s the horseradish” and going on to my next thought.

IMG_1983

Yesterday I was cutting back and cleaning up the garden and realized that the horseradish had died back from the frost and was ready for harvest. I thought I’d pull some out for Michael to enjoy. I didn’t get the horseradish gene but he and my mom eat it like it’s candy. So I started digging, for at least an hour.  Long story short, we have a lot of horseradish root out there and it’s buried very deeply.  There will be horseradish on our property for many years to come. 

IMG_4308Here’s what I was able to dig out. It was getting dark and I was tired. We had pizza for dinner.

IMG_4312… a view with my hand to give you a better sense of the size of this root.

IMG_4313I soaked it a little and washed the dirt off. My middle daughter, the Harry Potter fan, saw this and immediately went downstairs and put in the Harry Potter movie with Professor Sprout and the mandrakes and watched the whole thing, lol.

IMG_4322It looks like the large one is actually six roots that fused together. I might of missed it last year.

IMG_4314The smaller, normal size root was easily peeled and chopped.

IMG_4315Then I processed it with some water and red wine vinegar.

IMG_4320And my Michael was happy.

He doesn’t smile like this for just anything.

The larger root is still sitting on my counter. I think that I’m going to try to cut it into smaller pieces and freeze it to grate later since the refrigerated version only lasts for up to six weeks.

Looking forward to a nice horseradish cream sauce with the roast beef on Christmas Day 🙂

Enjoy everything!

Michele

16 Comments

    1. He truly doesn’t smile for the camera like that easily, so it really made my day! The horseradish is very easy to grow, just put it in and leave it for a year or so. If you want some and can’t find it in Ireland I may be able to send you a root in some sand or something? That would surely alert the Homeland security people, lol.

    1. I don’t like it either Brenda but since others around here do I’m happy to have it. It’s very easy to grow. I think I got the roots at Agway. I didn’t harvest it the first year to give it a chance to get established. After that look out!

  1. A fellow gardener has given us access to harvest all the horseradish we want. Once you plant it, you can’t get rid of it, so she has more than she needs. We’re waiting until winter to uproot it. When you food process it, doesn’t it make your eyes water and nose burn? That’s my main concern. Putting wine vinegar in, do you ferment it or store it in the fridge like that? I’d love to preserve a bunch. I love the stuff but have never made it.

    1. HI there Julianna! Thanks for stopping by and for commenting. Yes, it does make everything water and burn, be careful not to get too close. Apparently the pungency of it is determined by when you add the vinegar… if you put it in right away the horseradish is hotter than if you wait a few minutes (the recipes said as little as three minutes make a difference). I put it in the fridge but if you use more vinegar you could probably ferment it. It’s easy to do, especially if you love it. Just stand back!

      1. So does your husband like it hotter or do you wait a bit to add the vinegar? haha I love hot. Would you recommend adding the vinegar as it’s processing or immediately after? Sorry if that’s asking for too many detailed particulars. I’ve never done this, so it’s good to know. I could look up some of it online, and have watched numerous videos on processing horseradish, but this was slightly different than others and appeals to me.

      2. He likes it hot 😉 I added it just after processing but we haven’t used it yet. I have a new roast beef in the fridge (that we didn’t really have time to eat yet) I think I’ll make a spread using the recipe posted by J Johnson just above and make some sandwiches for lunch tomorrow.

  2. Recipe: Bud’s Horsey Sauce. fresh grated horseradish, sour cream, mayo, paprika, white pepper. Great for Roast Beef, French-Dip sandwiches, potato salad instead of mayo. Enjoy.

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